Nature of World   Leave a comment


On one occasion, the Bhagavā was staying at Bārāṇasi in the Deer Grove at Isipatana. There, he addressed the group of five bhikkhus: “Bhikkhus.” — “Venerable sir,” they replied. The Blessed One said this.

– Rūpa (form, body, matter, visible object), bhikkhus, is anatta. And if this rūpa were atta, bhikkhus, this rūpa would not lend itself to dis·ease, and it could [be said] of rūpa: ‘Let my rūpa be thus, let my rūpa not be thus.’ But it is because rūpa is anatta that rūpa lends itself to dis·ease, and that it cannot [be said] of rūpa: ‘Let my rūpa be thus, let my rūpa not be thus.’

Vedanā (feeling, sensitive part of mind), bhikkhus, is anatta. And if this vedanā were atta, bhikkhus, this vedanā would not lend itself to dis·ease, and it could [be said] of vedanā: ‘Let my vedanā be thus, let my vedanā not be thus.’ But it is because vedanā is anatta that vedanā lends itself to dis·ease, and that it cannot [be said] of vedanā: ‘Let my vedanā be thus, let my vedanā not be thus.’

Saññā (perception, sense recognized), bhikkhus, is anatta. And if this saññā were atta, bhikkhus, this saññā would not lend itself to dis·ease, and it could [be said] of saññā: ‘Let my saññā be thus, let my saññā not be thus.’ But it is because saññā is anatta that saññā lends itself to dis·ease, and that it cannot [be said] of saññā: ‘Let my saññā be thus, let my saññā not be thus.’

Saṅkhāras (constructed, conditioned phenomena, deposited, mental volition, mental fabrication), bhikkhus, are anatta. And if these saṅkhāras were atta, bhikkhus, these saṅkhāras would not lend themselves to dis·ease, and it could [be said] of saṅkhāras: ‘Let my saṅkhāras be thus, let my saṅkhāras not be thus.’ But it is because saṅkhāras are anatta that saṅkhāras lend themselves to dis·ease, and that it cannot [be said] of saṅkhāras: ‘Let my saṅkhāras be thus, let my saṅkhāras not be thus.’

Viññāṇa (conscience, consciousness, cognizing part of mind), bhikkhus, is anatta. And if this viññāṇa were atta, bhikkhus, this viññāṇa would not lend itself to dis·ease, and it could [be said] of viññāṇa: ‘Let my viññāṇa be thus, let my viññāṇa not be thus.’ But it is because viññāṇa is anatta that viññāṇa lends itself to dis·ease, and that it cannot [be said] of viññāṇa: ‘Let my viññāṇa be thus, let my viññāṇa not be thus.’

What do you think of this, bhikkhus: is Rūpa permanent or anicca?
 Anicca, Bhante.

– And that which is anicca, is it dukkha or sukha?{1}

Dukkha, Bhante.

– And that which is aniccadukkha, by nature subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: ‘This is mine. I am this. This is my atta?’

No, Bhante.

Is Vedanā permanent or anicca?

Anicca, Bhante.

– And that which is anicca, is it dukkha or sukha?

– Dukkha, Bhante.

– And that which is aniccadukkha, by nature subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: ‘This is mine. I am this. This is my atta?’

– No, Bhante.

 

– Is Saññā permanent or anicca?

– Anicca, Bhante.

– And that which is anicca, is it dukkha or sukha?

– Dukkha, Bhante.

– And that which is aniccadukkha, by nature subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: ‘This is mine. I am this. This is my atta?’

– No, Bhante.

 

– Are Saṅkhāras permanent or anicca?

– Anicca, Bhante.

– And that which is anicca, is it dukkha or sukha?

– Dukkha, Bhante.

– And that which is aniccadukkha, by nature subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: ‘This is mine. I am this. This is my atta?’

– No, Bhante.

– Is Viññāṇa permanent or anicca?

– Anicca, Bhante.

– And that which is anicca, is it dukkha or sukha?

– Dukkha, Bhante.

– And that which is aniccadukkha, by nature subject to change, is it proper to regard it as: ‘This is mine. I am this. This is my atta?’

– No, Bhante.

– Therefore, bhikkhus, whatever rūpa, be it past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or exalted, far or near, any rūpa is to be seen yathā·bhūtaṃ with proper paññā in this way: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my atta.’

Whatever vedanā, be it past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or exalted, far or near, any vedanā is to be seen yathā·bhūtaṃ (according to reality, true nature) with proper paññā in this way: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my atta.’

Whatever saññā, be it past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or exalted, far or near, any saññā is to be seen yathā·bhūtaṃ with proper paññā in this way: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my atta.’

Whatever saṅkhāras, be them past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or exalted, far or near, any saṅkhāras are to be seen yathā·bhūtaṃ with proper paññā in this way: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my atta.’

Whatever viññāṇa, be it past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or exalted, far or near, any viññāṇa is to be seen yathā·bhūtaṃ with proper paññā in this way: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my atta.’

Seeing thus, an instructed noble disciple gets disenchanted with rūpa, disenchanted with vedanā, disenchanted with saññā, disenchanted with saṅkhāras, disenchanted with viññāṇa. Being disenchanted, he becomes dispassionate. Through dispassion, he is liberated. With liberation, there is the ñāṇa: ‘Liberated.’ He understands: ‘Birth is ended, the sublime life has been lived, what was to be done has been done, there is nothing more for this existence.’

This is what the Bhagavā said. Delighted, the group of five bhikkhus was pleased by his words. And while this exposition was being given, the cittas (mind) of the group of five bhikkhus, by not clinging, were liberated from the āsavas (flow).

If we look at the world, everything is impermanent (transient), such temporarily existent everything is beyond our control, therefore, everything we cling to or avoid worldly things are suffering. In the time scale, all species on earth has their own life time from instant to years. Knowing it, we learn an art of living and art of dying. In our life time, we think or cling to things seem to stay long, but if you see in the larger time frame, it is an instant moment. But our desire that things should live long as unchanging, and at times, we forget that we all die, while busy in collecting the worldly materials. In the end, due to the innate nature of things, lives are that it all keeps changing, and our clinging mind cannot stop the changing process and when it changes as fading, destroying, dying of things, lives beyond our control, we tend to suffer as our expectations cannot be met. If we could ever do observation of this world by the forward speeding, then, the whole world systems have always molded differently. We so called relative happiness of this worldly things are petite in comparison to the ultimate happiness.

Our mind gets swept away in the flow of life for the worldly things like the way we are drown in the river flows with river flow. Like this we have been swimming in the ocean of samsara (world’s nature) due to our own ignorant, limitations. We are not aware of any method or system on how to deal with the world in order to end such suffering until the appearance of the fully enlightened one, Shakyamuni, the World honored one. The only method is to be a stead observer with full awareness without any reaction to things happening in this samsara. Let it happen, whatever happens in this world, be a good observer, you will gain the wisdom of the ‘Cause and Effect’ relation through realization. Then, our mind becomes calm full with serenity and serenity.

Nature of world systems: the cycle of formation, maturation, decline and decay (disintegration) implies in the physical or mental world is undergoing constant change. Everything is just a flux moment by moment. Indeed, so apparently unstable eve in the subatomic world or dimensions. Some things or some ones have their own time, earlier or later, it tends to change according to the law of natural system.

Our limited study, analysis and experience (practice) in life has let us become ignorant of the reality, therefore, our right intention should always be open to new information, broad and wide acceptance level for expansive understanding with new horizon in learning. But only your experience will make you realize it.

Our senses flow, reacts, lives with and within the vicious life-cycle continuum making the sensual worldly affairs due to our own limitation. Impermanence: Like the way, potters’ pots either small or large, fine or crude, all sentient beings destroy in the end. Death is inevitable. We suffer because our bodies is impermanent; they are subject to decay and death. All compounded things will decompose in the end. Be aware ! Stay alert ! All conditioned things are impermanent, all conditioned things are suffering or dukkha, and all dhamma are not self. We suffer because those things we get attached to are impermanent. If something is impermanent, that leads to suffering. Since everything in this world is impermanent, everything is suffering. It is the human nature to want the loved ones to be unharmed, and the enemies to come to harm. When either does not happen, that leads to suffering. That is what anicca means: the inability to maintain things to our liking. There are many things in this world that cause us suffering because they will not stay in the same condition or are destroyed; that is true. Most people do not understand why one should go to all this trouble to “give up all these sense pleasures and seek Nibbana“. There are many planes of existence, the lower ones suffer highly and upper ones less, but everything suffers in the end until nibbana is attained through meditation. Even if we are born in a higher realm where there is much happiness, that also cannot be maintained. One day, that life will be over and one WILL end up in a lower realm at some point, and then it will be very hard to get out of there. Even in this life there is much suffering, especially as one gets old, and the suffering is highest close to death if the death is due to an ailment.

Existence can be understood only if these three basic facts are comprehended, and this not only logically, but in confrontation with one’s own experience. Insight-wisdom (vipassanaa-pa~n~naa) which is the ultimate liberating factor in Buddhism, consists just of this experience of the three characteristics applied to one’s own bodily and mental processes, and deepened and matured in meditation.

To “see things as they really are” means seeing them consistently in the light of the three characteristics. Ignorance of these three, or self-deception about them, is by itself a potent cause for suffering — by knitting, as it were, the net of false hopes, of unrealistic and harmful desires, of false ideologies, false values and aims of life, in which man is caught. Ignoring or distorting these three basic facts can only lead to frustration, disappointment, and despair.

Impermanent are all component things,

 They arise and cease, that is their nature:

They come into being and pass away, Release from them is bliss supreme.

Aniccaa vata sa”nkhaaraa — uppaada vaya dhammino Uppajjitvaa nirujjhanti — tesa.m vuupasamo sukho.

— Mahaa-Parinibbaana Sutta (DN 16)[1]

Change or impermanence is the essential characteristic of all phenomenal existence. We cannot say of anything, animate or inanimate, organic or inorganic, “this is lasting”; for even while we are saying this, it would be undergoing change.

Buddha, ‘Vaya Dhamma Sankhara’. Trans. ‘Decay Nature is inherent in all composite things.’

Posted January 14, 2020 by arjunlimbu in Uncategorized

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